Electric Batteries Lasting Twice As Long As Cars

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EV batteries can last two decades

EV batteries can last two decades

Technological advancement within the electrification of vehicles may now have surpassed the vehicle itself.

Data from Nissan recently revealed that the battery life on its Leaf will outlast the expected life expectancy by nearly double, with the average car being on the road for 10-12 years but the battery lasting 22.

Francisco Carranza, managing director of Renault-Nissan Energy Services, told the media that the brand had plans in place to deal with the findings.

“We are going to have to recover those batteries,” Carranza told the Automotive News Europe Congress.

Nissan announced that it was looking at multiple situations where its battery products can be reused or repurposed.

In 2018, Nissan introduced a three-megawatt storage system that uses the equivalent of 148 Leaf batteries -- both new and used -- at the ArenA soccer stadium in Amsterdam. The project was aimed at providing a more reliable and efficient energy supply and usage back into the grid.

The automaker also began to offer solar panels and battery storage for homes -- following the lead of Tesla -- in the UK, with a cost cost from just under $10k.

Carranza said that the company is decidedly moving towards diversification along with electrification.

“We are stepping away from the garage and closer to the living room,” he said.

Nissan is also researching different ways in which its EVs can be used to balance the supply and demand of energy at peak times by storing its energy and then returning it to the grid during times the car is not in use.

Carranza did not indicate issues with capacity loss nor did he say how long a second-life battery could operate in another vehicle, but he did say that investigating all possibilities was not just a matter of due diligence.

“The more you dig, the more you find gold," he said. "The amount of revenue and profit by using vehicles to provide services to the grid is big.”